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Bonjour mes amies, take a look on this site:… - We're all dead here. [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
All hail the glorious dead.

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[Jul. 9th, 2006|09:00 am]
All hail the glorious dead.

napoleonic_dead

[redgenji]
Bonjour mes amies, take a look on this site:

http://www.empereurperdu.com/aaccueil.html
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Comments:
From: marshalmeg
2006-07-10 04:08 am (UTC)
That is one of the most interesting things I have read in a long time. While I don't normally buy into too many involved historical conspiracy theories, I do think that one brings up some interesting points, particularly in regards to the whole issue of the British and the return of Napoleon's body from St. Helena.

British Society, the British Army, and British attitudes toward Napoleon have always been particularly fascinating to me. While many of the powerful English politicians in the 1840's either were or would have been hostile to the idea of returning Napoleon's remains to France, the English population (especially the English political world) had always been divided in their opinions about the Emperor. In fact, some of the most devoted and vocal Bonapartists were English. A good example would be the very power Whig party member Charles Fox and his family and friends. They sent letters and presents to Napoleon while he was on St. Helena, petitioned the English government to treat him better, and very likely tried to help plot his escape. During the Peninsular War the Duke of Wellington was always worried that a change in government would bring about the end of the war due to lack of governmental support or funding. Further, though the English government and many common English people considered Napoleon the enemy for years it is in the English national character to be magnanimous in victory. The Duke himself tried to embody this, frequently praising Bonaparte and his military prowess. Wellington himself also seems to have supported the 1840 reinternment of Napoleon in Paris, saying something to the effect of not seeing any reasons why not at that point in time. Even Queen Victoria (arguably the most British of British monarchs) visits Napoleon's tomb and remarks on his greatness.

Personally, I think Wellington might have been furious about and disgusted by the idea. Deep down I think there were few people who hated Napoleon more, but I can't and don't know that for certain. Wellington hoped that through exile Napoleon would be forgotten by the French people and by Europe as opposed to having been turned into a martyr through execution by the newly-restored Bourbon government. I think he would have been disappointed that things turned out profoundly the opposite of how he had wanted and anticipated. Maybe half of his passive support of the return of the body was through failure-generated apathy. Wellington was not a man used to losing or being wrong, he had profound difficulty with ever admitting to being wrong.

That all said and being the major argument against a few of the points made in support of that theory, there are some parts of it which I find distinctly interesting. First, I personally like the idea that the British might have stolen and/or kept the Emperor's body out of spite. I can think of a great many Englishmen this would have pleased and it seems a fitting outcome, as does the idea of people going to Napoleon's tomb to stand in awe of... a butler. (Pardon me, I am REALLY REALLY bitter, as though that were not obvious already.) I think that evidence, if it can be proven accurate, proves that /something/ was done to the Emperor's body. Whether it was replaced with another (maybe Napoleon's remaining loyal servants actually buried it somewhere else just to spite the English or possibly to keep the body out of British or allied hands, even if it meant leaving it on St. Helena?), or simply the victim of grave robbers (this could even include people who just wanted to 'see the Emperor'), or that certain minor changes were made prior to the burial that none of those present later really knew about.

I'm sorry to have rambled on for so long. Thank you for posting the link!
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[User Picture]From: redgenji
2006-07-10 12:27 pm (UTC)
I am the one to thank you for your deep reflections. The post is brilliant. I have a few things to say about this article too, and I'll do it when I'm in the mood. I've sent some caricatures of Napoleon to caudelac and asked her to resent it to you because I don't have your e-mail address. Did you get them? I haven't got an answer from her...
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[User Picture]From: caudelac
2006-07-12 04:35 pm (UTC)
I showed them to her when I was up in KY... sorry I forgot to reply to the e-mail, as I am occasionally lazy like that.

But dear god, those were priceless!
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[User Picture]From: redgenji
2006-07-13 11:39 am (UTC)
I still have some more to send... don't be sorry I'm very lazy too
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